Posts Tagged with "Sinar Mas Group"

Warning to Banks: Don’t Finance Rainforest Destruction

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

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Warning to Banks: Don’t Finance Rainforest Destruction

Last week, RAN joined sixty environmental and social organizations, including a dozen Indonesian groups, in signing an open letter to banks and other financial institutions across the globe warning them to avoid investments in pulp and paper industry projects associated with deforestation and human right abuses in Indonesia. The letter highlights concern with companies associated [...]

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Palm Oil Pariah Sinar Mas Commits to Forest Protection. What About Cargill?

Friday, March 4, 2011

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Palm Oil Pariah Sinar Mas Commits to Forest Protection. What About Cargill?

Sinar Mas Group, the notorious international palm oil pariah, recently made a remarkable announcement: The company’s subsidiary, Golden Agri Resouces (GAR), intends to implement a forest conservation policy. Among other things, GAR’s Forest Conservation Policy commits it to a goal of “no new development” on peat lands, High Conservation Value Forest areas or High Carbon [...]

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Massive Banners Dropped on Cargill, Grain Exchange Skyway

Thursday, September 23, 2010

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Despite state-wide flood warnings, the skies opened for just enough time to allow five RAN activists to hang two billboard sized banners off of a 3rd street skyway during morning rush hour today, calling attention to Cargill’s continuing role in the destruction of some of the world’s last remaining rainforests. Reading: “Cargill: #1 Supplier of [...]

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Cargill’s New Palm Oil Deal for Unilever: Can It Be Called Sustainable?

Friday, August 6, 2010

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The growing international focus on companies that produce, trade, or use palm oil is quickly separating out the market leaders, like Unilever and Nestle, from companies that are taking an active role in adopting policies to safeguard their climate footprint, from the rainforest destroyers (i.e. Cargill and General Mills).

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