West Virginia Chemical Leak Poisons 300,000 Peoples’ Water Supply

share this story
facebook twitter email stumble upon
Get Energy Alerts

WaterDistro.jogSince last Thursday’s toxic spill, when a coal-processing chemical spilled into West Virginia’s Elk River, roughly 300,000 people have lost access to tap water.

Our friends at groups like OVEC, Keepers of the Mountain, Coal River Mountain Watch and Aurora Lights are volunteering and working long days to  drive clean water supplies to desparate and remote communities throughout the nine affected counties in West Virginia. A few dollars goes a long way to help. Click any of those links to donate.

I just donated and want to urge you to consider making a donation to water relief efforts too.

Yet again Appalachian communities are being disenfranchised. This industrial disaster is not getting much play in the national media, despite being just a few hours from the nation’s capital. Meanwhile, West Virginia’s Governor keeps insisting that this disaster has nothing to do with the coal industry.

To be clear, the chemical that spilled (4-methylcyclohexane methanol) is a chemical that is produced for use producing coal (the “cheapest” form of energy in this country) and the reason that a relatively small spill was able to impact so many people’s drinking water (16% of the state) is that decades of contamination from coal mining and processing means that many rural communities can no longer rely on well water, and instead have to connect the municipal water systems. Then the privatization of public infrastructure means that the business has been aggressively consolidated into even larger distribution networks.

Combine all that with the regulatory joke that is West Virginia’s “Department of Environmental Protection” (the site’s last inspection was in 1991), and you have a disaster on your hands.

Ken Ward (IMO the smartest journalist covering these issues) wrote this morning:

Plenty of West Virginia communities have watched their drinking water supplies be either polluted or dried up because of coal (see here, here and here). Me and my neighbors are getting a taste right now of what some coalfield residents live with all the time.

If you want to help spread awareness of this tragedy and the urgent need for support of the affected West Virginians, please share this post on Facebook.

no such thing clean coal

1 Comment For This Post I'd Love to Hear Yours!

  1. ryan simmons says:

    I will do everything to stop pollution

Leave a Comment Here's Your Chance to Be Heard!

Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. You can also subscribe without commenting.